Condition Spotlight

Sleep plays a vital role in good health and well-being throughout your life. Getting enough quality sleep at the right times can help protect your mental health, physical health, quality of life, and safety.

The way you feel while you’re awake depends in part on what happens while you’re sleeping. During sleep, your body is working to support healthy brain function and maintain your physical health. In children and teens, sleep also helps support growth and development.

6 Signs You Need More Sleep

A national study on sleep in the United States found that many Americans, while recognizing the importance of sleep, fail to prioritize daily sleeping habits in their everyday lives. With more demanding work hours and Read More

How Meal Timing Impacts Sleep

Even one night of tossing and turning can disrupt your week, leaving you exhausted, overwhelmed, and easily irritated. When poor sleep becomes more consistent, you face many risks for different health conditions. Sleep is critical Read More

Working from home and can’t sleep? 

During the past few years many people have transitioned to working from home. Some people are finding it difficult to sleep. One of the reasons for this problem is caused by disruptions to the circadian Read More

9 Tips for Better Sleep

The exciting research in sleep science nowadays comes from labs studying the effects of  getting better sleep on the brain and what happens when you deprive your brain of restorative sleep. New research suggests that Read More

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We spend up to a third of our lives asleep. Although some hard-driven people may view sleep as an inconvenience that curtails productivity and leisure activities, slumber is certainly no waste of time. In fact, sleep may play a more crucial role than diet or exercise in fostering optimal health. Sleep is a natural restorative, an antidote to the damage done to our bodies during the course of the day. It allows the body to replenish its immune system, eliminate free radicals, and ward off heart disease and mood imbalances. As an essential part of the daily human cycle, sleep is a determining factor in the state of a person’s health.

A National Sleep Foundation Survey found millions of Americans are suffering from daytime sleepiness—43% of adults say that they are so sleepy during the day that it interferes with daily activity. Drowsy driving causes at least 100,000 car accidents in the U.S. each year, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; 62% of adults reported driving while feeling drowsy. And 60% of children under the age of 18 complained of feeling tired during the day, while 15% admitted to falling asleep at school.

The quantity and quality of sleep vary from person to person, but how well and how long one sleeps is ultimately the result of physical and psychological influences. Not only does stress, illness, and anxiety contribute to sleep disorders, but so can external circumstances, such as a noisy sleeping room, as well as disturbed biological rhythms due to night-shift work and jet lag. A shortened attention span, the loss of physical strength, and difficulty in responding to unfamiliar situations are all common symptoms of sleep disorders.