Condition Spotlight

Menopause is the time in a woman’s life when her period stops. It usually occurs naturally, most often after age 45. Menopause happens because the woman’s ovaries stop producing the hormones estrogen and progesterone.

Hot Flashes Reduced by Diet Change

A new study, published in the journal Menopause, found a plant-based diet rich in soy reduces moderate-to-severe hot flashes by 84%, from nearly five per day to fewer than one per day. During the 12-week study, Read More

Rheumatoid arthritis and menopause

A recent study published in Rheumatology suggests that women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer a greater decline in physical function following menopause. After studying 8189 women with RA, researchers found that pre-menopausal women experienced a Read More

Seeking Care from a Menopause Specialist

Hot flashes, trouble sleeping, mood changes, irregular vaginal bleeding, and vaginal dryness are common symptoms of menopause, a time when women’s bodies no longer produce the hormone estrogen as they once did. While these symptoms Read More

Hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes

Hot flashes, undoubtedly the most common symptom of menopause, are not just uncomfortable and inconvenient, but numerous studies demonstrate they may increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests Read More

Cooling Hot Flashes

Hot flashes and night sweats can be debilitating. More than 80 percent of women are affected by hot flashes at some point. They may start long before you stop menstruating and continue for several years Read More

Panic Attacks and Menopause

Women often experience panic attacks and even heart palpitations during menopause, even if they’ve never really been bothered by them before. These symptoms may come on suddenly, sometimes just prior to a hot flash, and Read More

6 Menopause Busting Foods

The Galveston Diet, the first and only nutrition program designed for women in menopause by a board-certified OBGYN, Dr. Mary Claire Haver shares the top six foods to help with menopause symptoms. “During menopause our hormones Read More

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A woman has reached menopause when she has not had a period for one year. Changes and symptoms can start several years earlier. They include

  • A change in periods – shorter or longer, lighter or heavier, with more or less time in between
  • Hot flashes and/or night sweats
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Mood swings
  • Trouble focusing
  • Less hair on head, more on face

Some symptoms require treatment. Talk to your doctor about how to best manage menopause. Make sure the doctor knows your medical history and your family medical history. This includes whether you are at risk for heart disease, osteoporosis, or breast cancer.

A common symptom of menopause is the appearance of hot flashes (sometimes called a hot flush). Hot flashes occur because of changing estrogen levels in a woman’s body.1 A hot flash consists of a sudden feeling of heat and may include flushing of the face and neck, red blotches on the chest and arms, and sweating followed by shivering. A hot flash can last 30 seconds to 10 minutes.

During menopause, many women experience vaginal dryness, which can make sexual intercourse uncomfortable and can lead to vaginal or urinary tract infections. In addition, the bladder muscles may weaken, which could lead to urine leakage when sneezing, coughing, laughing, or running. This condition is called urinary incontinence (pronounced in-KON-tn-uhns).