Build Strong Bones

When we think of building bones we think calcium. Joints thrive with compression and decompression, bathing the joint surfaces with synovial fluid. You can help strengthen bones when your direct the appropriate amount of force Read More

Rheumatoid arthritis and menopause

A recent study published in Rheumatology suggests that women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer a greater decline in physical function following menopause. After studying 8189 women with RA, researchers found that pre-menopausal women experienced a Read More

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Vitamin D?

Maintaining sufficient vitamin D levels may help to prevent the onset of inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered. The research also found that while Vitamin D can Read More

A Healthy Bones Cheat Sheet

Bones play many roles in the body — providing structure, protecting organs, anchoring muscles and storing calcium. While it’s important to build strong and healthy bones during childhood and adolescence, you can take steps during Read More

How to care for knee pain?

There are many causes for knee pain, and if you or a loved one are going through any kind of pain, the first thing you should do is to go the doctor and determine the Read More

Natural Remedies for Gout

While gout has been called “the disease of kings,” those afflicted feel anything but royal. This debilitating arthritic condition comes on suddenly when excessive uric acid in the blood crystalizes in the feet, ankles, wrists, Read More

1 2 3 4

We all know aging can take its toll on our bones, joints and overall mobility. Our movements and reflexes slow, our bones get thinner and lose their density, and we tend to naturally cut back on activity. But did you also know there are steps you can take to preserve and protect your bone and joint health?

The key to continued mobility as we age is staying active, sometimes even when we don’t feel like it. Just as important, is knowing our bodies, and its limitations. We boost our bone strength with exercises that “load” or compress them, but those activities are harder on our joints. Before starting on any exercise regimen, check with your physician, or work with a physical therapist, or personal trainer experienced in working with seniors to know what would be best for you.

Osteoporosis is sometimes referred to as a “silent thief” because it usually has no symptoms. Approximately one in four women and one in eight men over the age of 50 have been diagnosed with this condition.

It is important to note that it is normal to lose bone mass as we age, and that the definition of osteoporosis, or low bone density, uses the bone density of a young woman as the standard or “norm.” It is therefore logical that the bone densities of many middle-aged and older women are considered low. Nevertheless, osteoporosis can potentially diminish a person’s quality of life.