Can Knee Arthritis Treat Without Surgery?

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability among US adults, 55 and older, and in many cases leads to total joint replacements. That is a big decision sometimes necessary, sometimes premature, says Victor Romano, MD, Read More

Pros and Cons of the Vegetarian Diet

Becoming a vegetarian has become more appealing and accessible, thanks to the year-round availability of fresh produce, more vegetarian dining options, and the growing culinary influence of cultures with largely plant-based diets. Vegetarian diets can vary Read More

Can Muesli improve joint health?

It is well known that healthy eating increases our general sense of well being. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universit’t Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fiber-rich diet can have a positive influence on chronic inflammatory joint Read More

Calcium Overdose

Many of us have been led to believe a piece of conventional “wisdom” that is taking a significant toll on our health especially on women and children. The conventional wisdom, more accurately described as ignorance, Read More

Build Strong Bones

When we think of building bones we think calcium. Joints thrive with compression and decompression, bathing the joint surfaces with synovial fluid. You can help strengthen bones when your direct the appropriate amount of force Read More

Rheumatoid arthritis and menopause

A recent study published in Rheumatology suggests that women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer a greater decline in physical function following menopause. After studying 8189 women with RA, researchers found that pre-menopausal women experienced a Read More

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We all know aging can take its toll on our bones, joints and overall mobility. Our movements and reflexes slow, our bones get thinner and lose their density, and we tend to naturally cut back on activity. But did you also know there are steps you can take to preserve and protect your bone and joint health?

The key to continued mobility as we age is staying active, sometimes even when we don’t feel like it. Just as important, is knowing our bodies, and its limitations. We boost our bone strength with exercises that “load” or compress them, but those activities are harder on our joints. Before starting on any exercise regimen, check with your physician, or work with a physical therapist, or personal trainer experienced in working with seniors to know what would be best for you.

Osteoporosis is sometimes referred to as a “silent thief” because it usually has no symptoms. Approximately one in four women and one in eight men over the age of 50 have been diagnosed with this condition.

It is important to note that it is normal to lose bone mass as we age, and that the definition of osteoporosis, or low bone density, uses the bone density of a young woman as the standard or “norm.” It is therefore logical that the bone densities of many middle-aged and older women are considered low. Nevertheless, osteoporosis can potentially diminish a person’s quality of life.