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There are many causes for knee pain, and if you or a loved one are going through any kind of pain, the first thing you should do is to go the doctor and determine the Read More

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While gout has been called “the disease of kings,” those afflicted feel anything but royal. This debilitating arthritic condition comes on suddenly when excessive uric acid in the blood crystalizes in the feet, ankles, wrists, Read More

5 Ways to Assess Your Foot Health

Do you ever experience foot problems? How often should you check your feet? If you’re an average walker, you take about 10,000 steps per day, which add up to more than 3 million steps per Read More

Does Rain Increase Joint Pain?

Some people with joint pain and arthritis swear that weather influences their pain. New research, perhaps the deepest, data-based dive into this suggestion, finds that weather conditions in 45 U.S. cities are indeed associated with Read More

How to Manage Lower Back Pain?

Lower back pain is known to affect over 80 percent of all adults at some point in their lives. It is one of the most common reasons why people miss work and see doctors, only Read More

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We all know aging can take its toll on our bones, joints and overall mobility. Our movements and reflexes slow, our bones get thinner and lose their density, and we tend to naturally cut back on activity. But did you also know there are steps you can take to preserve and protect your bone and joint health?

The key to continued mobility as we age is staying active, sometimes even when we don’t feel like it. Just as important, is knowing our bodies, and its limitations. We boost our bone strength with exercises that “load” or compress them, but those activities are harder on our joints. Before starting on any exercise regimen, check with your physician, or work with a physical therapist, or personal trainer experienced in working with seniors to know what would be best for you.

Osteoporosis is sometimes referred to as a “silent thief” because it usually has no symptoms. Approximately one in four women and one in eight men over the age of 50 have been diagnosed with this condition.

It is important to note that it is normal to lose bone mass as we age, and that the definition of osteoporosis, or low bone density, uses the bone density of a young woman as the standard or “norm.” It is therefore logical that the bone densities of many middle-aged and older women are considered low. Nevertheless, osteoporosis can potentially diminish a person’s quality of life.