Arthritis Treated Without Surgery?

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability among US adults, 55 and older, and in many cases leads to total joint replacements. That is a big decision sometimes necessary, sometimes premature, says Victor Romano, MD, Read More

5 Ways to Assess Your Foot Health

Do you ever experience foot problems? How often should you check your feet? If you’re an average walker, you take about 10,000 steps per day, which add up to more than 3 million steps per Read More

Does Rain Increase Joint Pain?

Some people with joint pain and arthritis swear that weather influences their pain. New research, perhaps the deepest, data-based dive into this suggestion, finds that weather conditions in 45 U.S. cities are indeed associated with Read More

6 Tips for Preventing Shoulder Pain

Shoulder pain is unpleasant and can be very dangerous. It’s a good idea to plan ahead and reduce your risk by managing your activity appropriately. These 6 tips will help you to prevent injury to Read More

What Causes My Heel Pain?

While there can be many reasons for heel pain, we as foot and ankle surgeons categorize heel pain into four major causes: plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, bursitis and nerve pain. Diagnosing the specific issue depends Read More

Bad Habits That Cause Joint Pains

Joint Pains Most people fall in the trap of treating an ailment rather than finding ways to prevent the complication. Some conditions such as joint pains may occur naturally from within your system, but some Read More

Hip Pain: Causes and Treatment

Hip pain is quite a common issue and can result from a wide variety of causes. Finding the precise location of the pain can provide clues to identify the underlying causes of hip pain. For Read More

Dealing with Lower Back Pain

Lower back pain is known to affect over 80 percent of all adults at some point in their lives. It is one of the most common reasons why people miss work and see doctors, only Read More

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We all know aging can take its toll on our bones, joints and overall mobility. Our movements and reflexes slow, our bones get thinner and lose their density, and we tend to naturally cut back on activity. But did you also know there are steps you can take to preserve and protect your bone and joint health?

The key to continued mobility as we age is staying active, sometimes even when we don’t feel like it. Just as important, is knowing our bodies, and its limitations. We boost our bone strength with exercises that “load” or compress them, but those activities are harder on our joints. Before starting on any exercise regimen, check with your physician, or work with a physical therapist, or personal trainer experienced in working with seniors to know what would be best for you.

Osteoporosis is sometimes referred to as a “silent thief” because it usually has no symptoms. Approximately one in four women and one in eight men over the age of 50 have been diagnosed with this condition.

It is important to note that it is normal to lose bone mass as we age, and that the definition of osteoporosis, or low bone density, uses the bone density of a young woman as the standard or “norm.” It is therefore logical that the bone densities of many middle-aged and older women are considered low. Nevertheless, osteoporosis can potentially diminish a person’s quality of life.