How to cope with reentry anxiety amid COVID-19

Dealing with reentry anxiety

As more Americans are getting vaccinated against COVID-19, things are slowly shifting to normalcy. Businesses are opening, restaurants are returning to full capacity, social events and nightlife are coming back to life, causing some to experience reentry anxiety – the stress that people feel as it pertains to getting life back to normal in a post-pandemic world.

Allow yourself to proceed at your own pace.  Give yourself permission to proceed at your own pace, step by step, according to your own comfort level.  We can’t control the decisions that other people make.  But if you feel the need to tip-toe back into the new world, if you need to wear your mask on the street or in the grocery store, even if you don’t have to anymore, then do so. If you aren’t ready to eat in a restaurant, you don’t have to force yourself.  We’re all a little, or a lot, traumatized by the events of the past year, the upheaval wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic.  We’re all going to be recovering emotionally at our own individual pace.  It’s okay to take it as slowly as you need to.  What’s important is protecting your peace of mind.  Baby steps. 

Remember that patience continues to be a virtue.  Here are a few things to keep in mind.  We still have the spring and summer ahead of us, with restrictions gradually being reduced.  Most companies are talking about the fall as the time when they will consider inviting employees back to the office.  States are still watching the numbers closely.  The pandemic rages globally, which places us all at elevated risk regardless of how normal life appears In our own communities.  Humans don’t do well with uncertainty, as we have learned over the past year.  But life is still uncertain.  And don’t forget the people I just advised to progress at their own pace.  Yep, patience is still needed!  You’re probably tired of being told this, but one step at a time still holds.

Keep your mind open.  Thoughts about what life might look like going forward can inevitably lead to more anxiety. Without concrete information, your mind tries to do you a big favor by giving you a story.  Unfortunately, that story is generally inaccurate, based on unrealistic expectations or a worst case scenario.  Either away, a recipe for more anxiety.  One of the biggest lessons of the pandemic has been that we are not in control, that life is uncertain.  The future will provide us all with another opportunity to learn to live with uncertainty.  Some of what you have been missing during the pandemic may return just as you remember it.  Other aspects of the way we lived may be modified in ways we never thought we would see.  What we do know is that life as we knew it will probably never be quite the same.  So keep your mind open.  Be prepared to know when you know, and to adjust accordingly.  Your foundation is intact, you’ve proven to yourself how resilient you are.  Life is always interesting and surprising if you stay open to what’s possible!  

Source: Dr. Gary McClain, mental health specialist Mayv an app (free in Apple Store and Google Play) that guides users through an effective mind-body approach through a customized, interactive program.

How to cope with reentry anxiety amid COVID-19

 

As more Americans are getting vaccinated against COVID-19, things are slowly shifting to normalcy. Businesses are opening, restaurants are returning to full capacity, social events and nightlife are coming back to life, causing some to experience reentry anxiety – the stress that people feel as it pertains to getting life back to normal in a post-pandemic world.

Allow yourself to proceed at your own pace.  Give yourself permission to proceed at your own pace, step by step, according to your own comfort level.  We can’t control the decisions that other people make.  But if you feel the need to tip-toe back into the new world, if you need to wear your mask on the street or in the grocery store, even if you don’t have to anymore, then do so. If you aren’t ready to eat in a restaurant, you don’t have to force yourself.  We’re all a little, or a lot, traumatized by the events of the past year, the upheaval wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic.  We’re all going to be recovering emotionally at our own individual pace.  It’s okay to take it as slowly as you need to.  What’s important is protecting your peace of mind.  Baby steps. 

Remember that patience continues to be a virtue.  Here are a few things to keep in mind.  We still have the spring and summer ahead of us, with restrictions gradually being reduced.  Most companies are talking about the fall as the time when they will consider inviting employees back to the office.  States are still watching the numbers closely.  The pandemic rages globally, which places us all at elevated risk regardless of how normal life appears In our own communities.  Humans don’t do well with uncertainty, as we have learned over the past year.  But life is still uncertain.  And don’t forget the people I just advised to progress at their own pace.  Yep, patience is still needed!  You’re probably tired of being told this, but one step at a time still holds.

Keep your mind open.  Thoughts about what life might look like going forward can inevitably lead to more anxiety. Without concrete information, your mind tries to do you a big favor by giving you a story.  Unfortunately, that story is generally inaccurate, based on unrealistic expectations or a worst case scenario.  Either away, a recipe for more anxiety.  One of the biggest lessons of the pandemic has been that we are not in control, that life is uncertain.  The future will provide us all with another opportunity to learn to live with uncertainty.  Some of what you have been missing during the pandemic may return just as you remember it.  Other aspects of the way we lived may be modified in ways we never thought we would see.  What we do know is that life as we knew it will probably never be quite the same.  So keep your mind open.  Be prepared to know when you know, and to adjust accordingly.  Your foundation is intact, you’ve proven to yourself how resilient you are.  Life is always interesting and surprising if you stay open to what’s possible!  

Source: Dr. Gary McClain, mental health specialist Mayv an app (free in Apple Store and Google Play) that guides users through an effective mind-body approach through a customized, interactive program.

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