Condition Spotlight

An estimated 6.2 million Americans age 65 and older are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2021. Seventy-two percent are age 75 or older.

  • One in nine people age 65 and older (11.3%) has Alzheimer’s dementia.
  • Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer’s are women.

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s dementia yet.  There are various ways to help a person with AD. Research has shown that physical exercise helps to enhance brain health and improves mood and general fitness. A balanced diet, enough sleep, and limited alcohol intake are other important ways to promote good brain health. Other illnesses that affect the brain, such as diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, should also be treated if present.

Eighty-three percent of the help provided to older adults in the United States comes from family members, friends or other unpaid caregivers. Not only do we provide information to help those suffering from Alzheimer’s but we also provide information to help support caregivers.

Can Alzheimer’s Disease Be Prevented?

Alzheimer’s Disease is a dreaded chronic condition which affects a considerable number of seniors around the world. With this disease hanging over our head and threatening our most basic functioning, there is always a question Read More

Breakthrough for Alzheimer’s Treatment?

Alzheimer’s Disease impacts many elderly. Inside Florida’s largest retirement community researchers using new brain-mapping technology are trying to peel back the secrets of the brain. The goal: Make world-changing discoveries about how our minds work Read More

New Insights into Alzheimer’s disease

A new study by Florida State University researchers may help answer some of the most difficult questions surrounding Alzheimer’s disease, an incurable and progressive illness affecting millions of families around the globe. Researchers showed that Read More

Do Alzheimer’s Patients Relate to Music?

Music and voice major Jessica Voutsinas 18 was singing the classic song “Over the Rainbow” to a resident at Longview an adult residential facility near the Ithaca College campus when the woman unexpectedly lit up Read More

Alzheimer’s disease related to Genetic factors

Researchers have identified several new genes responsible for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) including those leading to functional and structural changes in the brain and elevated levels of AD proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Unlike traditional Alzheimer’s Read More

Surprising Alzheimer’s Link Explained

A good night’s sleep refreshes body and mind, but a poor night’s sleep can do just the opposite. A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Radboud University Medical Centre in the Read More

Is Sugar a Cause of Alzheimer’s Disease?

Abnormally high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycaemia, is well-known as a characteristic of diabetes and obesity, but its link to Alzheimer’s disease is less familiar. Diabetes patients have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease Read More

Can We Find a Cure for Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s is a heart-wrenching disease that directly affects millions of people worldwide. There is no cure, let alone treatment to stop progression of the disease. While current answers are few, research at the University of Read More

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Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that affects memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms eventually grow severe enough to interfere with daily tasks.

Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of dementia, a general term for memory loss and other cognitive abilities serious enough to interfere with daily life. It accounts for 60-80% of dementia cases.

Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging. The greatest known risk factor is increasing age, and the majority of people with the disease are 65 and older. But it is not just a disease of old age. Approximately 200,000 Americans under the age of 65 have younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease (also known as early-onset Alzheimer’s).

Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease, that gets worse over time where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over a number of years. In its early stages, memory loss is mild, but with late-stage individuals lose the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to their environment. It is is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. On average, a person with Alzheimer’s lives four to eight years after diagnosis, but can live as long as 20 years, depending on other factors.

While there is no cure for the disease or a way to stop or slow its progression, there are drug and non-drug options that may help treat symptoms. Understanding available options can help individuals living with the disease and their caregivers to cope with symptoms and improve quality of life.

Effective communication with your doctor is important when you are seeking a diagnosis for memory loss. Ask questions, be prepared to answer questions and be as honest as possible.