Condition Spotlight

Aging is inevitable, but healthy aging is a goal we should all shoot for. The key to longevity is to live a long like and being able to actively be involved in daily activities. There are a number of ways you can incorporate these objectives into your everyday life.

Being physically active, mentally aware and socially adapt are all important in living a long healthy life. We provide tips on diet, exercise, mind-body tools and more to help you live a healthy life.

4 Tips to Stay Active As You Grow Older

Aging is a beautiful thing, and being in your prime years can be extremely rewarding, especially after having accomplished much of what you wanted to achieve in life. However, several challenges come with old age, Read More

6 Ways to Grow Old Gracefully

Aging is a natural part of life. Despite its inevitability, many people seek to halt or stall the process. For others, the goal is to embrace it fully and grow old gracefully instead, but how Read More

Does Feeling Younger Reduce Stress?

People who are feeling younger have a greater sense of well-being, better cognitive functioning, less inflammation, lower risk of hospitalization and even live longer than their older-feeling peers. A study published by the American Psychological Read More

Three Ways to Get Rid of Varicose Veins

Varicose veins are enlarged, swollen veins that often appear dark blue or purple, which happen when faulty valves in the veins allow blood to pool or flow in the wrong direction. Pregnant women and people Read More

Why Do Women Live Longer Than Men?

Humans are the only species in which one sex is known to have a ubiquitous survival advantage, Steven Austad, Ph.D., and Kathleen Fischer, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers write in their Read More

Can our Aging Clock be slowed down?

A recent study by University of Southern California and Yale University researchers suggests that at least part of the gains in life expectancy over recent decades may be due to a change in the rate Read More

Tea drinkers increase longevity

Habitual tea consumption is associated with lower risks of cardiovascular disease and all-cause death, increasing longevity according to a study published recently in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.   The favorable health effects are Read More

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Aging is associated with changes in dynamic biological, physiological, environmental, psychological, behavioral, and social processes. Some age-related changes are benign, such as graying hair. Others result in declines in function of the senses and activities of daily life and increased susceptibility to and frequency of disease, frailty, or disability. In fact, advancing age is the major risk factor for a number of chronic diseases in humans.

Studies from the basic biology of aging using laboratory animals — and now extended to human populations — have led to the emergence of theories to explain the process. While there is no single “key” to explain aging, these studies have demonstrated that the rate of aging can be slowed, suggesting that targeting aging will coincidentally slow the appearance and/or reduce the burden of numerous diseases and increase healthspan (the portion of life spent in good health).

To develop new interventions for the prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of aging-related diseases, disorders, and disabilities, we must first understand their causes and the factors that place people at increased risk for their initiation and progression. Researchers are engaged in basic science at all levels of analysis, from molecular to social, to understand the processes of aging and the factors that determine who ages “well” and who is susceptible to age-related disease and disability. Research is also ongoing to identify the interactions among genetic, environmental, lifestyle, behavioral, and social factors and their influence on the initiation and progression of age-related diseases and degenerative conditions.