Condition Spotlight

Aging is inevitable, but healthy aging is a goal we should all shoot for. The key to longevity is to live a long like and being able to actively be involved in daily activities. There are a number of ways you can incorporate these objectives into your everyday life.

Being physically active, mentally aware and socially adapt are all important in living a long healthy life. We provide tips on diet, exercise, mind-body tools and more to help you live a healthy life.

5 Natural Alternatives to Botox

Are you frustrated by fine lines and wrinkles making an appearance as you age? You’re not alone. That’s why botox has exploded in popularity in recent years, with “botox parties” popping up everywhere–and younger individuals Read More

The Middle-aged Man Makeover

If the man in your life has reached the big 4-0, he may be his own worst enemy when it comes to health. It may be time for a Man Makeover. Turning 40 typically means Read More

Tips for Living a Longer and Healthier Life

Today more people than ever are looking for ways to improve their health, increase energy, reduce stress, restore or enhance functionality, relieve aches and pains, balance emotions, and sharpen mental focus. Because of the demands Read More

Three Ways to Get Rid of Varicose Veins

Varicose veins are enlarged, swollen veins that often appear dark blue or purple, which happen when faulty valves in the veins allow blood to pool or flow in the wrong direction. Pregnant women and people Read More

Mediterranean diet may reduce chance of frailty

A new study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consuming a Mediterranean-style diet may prevent frailty. Defined as a recognizable state of increased vulnerability resulting from a decline in function across multiple physiological Read More

1 2 3 4 5 8

Aging is associated with changes in dynamic biological, physiological, environmental, psychological, behavioral, and social processes. Some age-related changes are benign, such as graying hair. Others result in declines in function of the senses and activities of daily life and increased susceptibility to and frequency of disease, frailty, or disability. In fact, advancing age is the major risk factor for a number of chronic diseases in humans.

Studies from the basic biology of aging using laboratory animals — and now extended to human populations — have led to the emergence of theories to explain the process. While there is no single “key” to explain aging, these studies have demonstrated that the rate of aging can be slowed, suggesting that targeting aging will coincidentally slow the appearance and/or reduce the burden of numerous diseases and increase healthspan (the portion of life spent in good health).

To develop new interventions for the prevention, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of aging-related diseases, disorders, and disabilities, we must first understand their causes and the factors that place people at increased risk for their initiation and progression. Researchers are engaged in basic science at all levels of analysis, from molecular to social, to understand the processes of aging and the factors that determine who ages “well” and who is susceptible to age-related disease and disability. Research is also ongoing to identify the interactions among genetic, environmental, lifestyle, behavioral, and social factors and their influence on the initiation and progression of age-related diseases and degenerative conditions.