Condition Spotlight

The term “Long-haulers Syndrome” broadly relates to people of all ages who have had a recent Covid-19 infection, subsequently tested negative at least once, yet still have persistent symptoms that may include fatigue, brain fog, gastrointestinal symptoms, headaches, shortness of breath, muscle aches, anxiety, reduced exercise tolerance and heart palpitations. These symptoms often evolve after the initial infection and may persist for months.

What is Long COVID?

Long COVID is a terminology many of us hear fairly often. But what does it mean? WHO (the World Health Organization) recently published a clinical case definition of long COVID that includes 12 domains and Read More

Help for COVID-19 long-haulers syndrome

A year into the pandemic, researchers are struggling to understand why some people are still suffering adverse effects long after they’ve recovered from an acute episode of COVID-19. Studies in the United States and Europe have Read More

Long-haulers Syndrome – Important Facts

The term “Long-haulers Syndrome” broadly relates to people of all ages who have had a recent Covid-19 infection, subsequently tested negative at least once, yet still have persistent symptoms that may include fatigue, brain fog, Read More

Researchers estimate about 10% of COVID-19 patients become long-haulers, according to a recent article from The Journal of the American Medical Association and a study done by British scientists. In the ever-evolving story of coronavirus (COVID-19), experts have now learned that some people can experience symptoms of the illness many weeks or even months after having it.

According to a recent report, most people fall into one of two groups when it comes to the virus. Approximately 80% of those with COVID-19 end up having a mild reaction and most of those cases resolve in about two weeks. For people who have a severe response to the virus, it can take between three and six weeks to recover.

But now, there is growing concern over a separate group of people who don’t seem to fall into either of those two categories. One study states that about 10% of people who’ve had COVID-19 will experience prolonged symptoms one, two or even three months after they were infected. One of the most frustrating parts? There seems to be no consistent reason for this to happen.

This group, which many refer to as “long-haulers,” is mixed with those who experienced both mild and severe cases. And this condition can effect anyone – young, old, those who were healthy, those who had a chronic condition, those who were hospitalized and those who weren’t.