Lower Testosterone Levels Could Lead to a Higher Mortality Risk

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The,Question,",Do,Testosterone,Levels,Decrease,In,Males?,"

A new research study reveals that men who have a lower testosterone level could have an increased risk of mortality and heart issues. Researchers at the University of Western Australia teamed up with researchers from North America, Australia, and across Europe to conduct a thorough review of 11 different studies comprised of over 24,000 people. These studies examined the correlation between sex hormones with mortality rates and cardiovascular disease in older men. The study revealed that low baseline levels of testosterone in men are associated with an increased risk of mortality rates and extremely low testosterone levels can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular death.

Specifically, those who are older with low testosterone levels are suspected to have a higher mortality rate compared to those who are older and have a higher testosterone level. However, men at any age who have lower testosterone levels are at an increased risk of disease than those who have a higher testosterone level. This compounds when men who are older and who already have a disease develop low testosterone levels.

There have been links discovered between chronic diseases such as diabetes and certain cancers and low testosterone levels as well. There isn’t a clear cause and effect for low testosterone levels and exactly what they can cause. However, there is a clear relationship between low testosterone levels and poor health conditions, especially in older men. This development can be a serious problem for older men with pre-existing conditions, so if you or a male loved one has a pre-existing condition and are older, keep an eye on their testosterone level to best maintain their health.

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The researchers aimed to clarify the impact of sex hormones on key health outcomes in ageing men, shedding light on previous inconsistent findings. Lead author Professor Bu Yeap from UWA’s Medical School said the findings revealed that men with very low baseline serum testosterone concentrations faced heightened risks of both cardiovascular death and all-cause mortality. The study was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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