Condition Spotlight

By living a healthy lifestyle, you can help keep your blood pressure in a healthy range. Preventing high blood pressure, which is also called hypertension, can lower your risk for heart disease and stroke.

Choose healthy meal and snack options to help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Talk with your health care team about eating a variety of foods rich in potassium, fiber, and protein and lower in salt (sodium) and saturated fat. For many people, making these healthy changes can help keep blood pressure low and protect against heart disease and stroke.

Learn more about controlling your blood pressure.

Spotlight on High Blood Pressure

Fred Wilson*, a 53-year-old construction worker and heavy-equipment operator, could handle a backhoe or bulldozer with nonchalant ease. But the heart beating inside his chest couldn’t handle his blood pressure. Wilson was among the millions Read More

Can Vitamin D Cure High Blood Pressure

Natural health experts have known for decades how powerful this particular vitamin is to battle high blood pressure. The big pharmaceutical companies have, however, used endless resources and influence to trash any study that showed Read More

Sauna Bathing Keeps Blood Pressure in Check

Frequent sauna bathing reduces the risk of elevated blood pressure, according to an extensive follow-up population-based study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. The risk of developing elevated blood pressure was nearly 50% Read More

A Snack that cuts Stroke Risk

If you could take a magic pill, that caused absolutely no side effects, that cut your risk of suffering stroke and heart attack in half, wouldn’t you take it? How about if there was one Read More

What is the DASH Diet?

Research has shown that following a healthy eating plan can both reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure and lower an already-elevated blood pressure. For an overall eating plan, consider the DASH diet. “DASH” Read More

An Impact from High Blood Pressure

Women who develop high blood pressure (HBP) in their 40s may be more likely to develop dementia years later, according to a study recently in the online issue of “Neurology”, the medical journal of the Read More

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Hypertension is a common chronic health issue also referred to a high lood pressure. One in three U.S. adults has high blood pressure, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This means the force of blood pushing against their artery walls is too high, which can damage the arteries and greatly increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure and kidney failure.

Lowering systolic blood pressure to a maximum of 120 mmHg has been shown to reduce these risks. There are two ways to accomplishing this: lifestyle changes and medications. While some people can lower blood pressure with lifestyle changes alone, the two approaches are complementary.