Does Scoliosis Have a Genetic Cause?

From birth, every individual is examined by a medical professional at least once per year. During that doctor visit, there will be an evaluation done on the spine to determine whether or not there is Read More

How Fat Can Treat Joint Issues

Body fat now can help treat bone joint conditions, including injuries and osteoarthritis — the type of arthritis caused by wear and tear in tissue between joints, which affects 27 million people. A new device Read More

Can Muesli improve joint health?

It is well known that healthy eating increases our general sense of well being. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universit?t Erlangen-N?rnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fiber-rich diet can have a positive influence on chronic inflammatory joint Read More

Recommendations for Bone Health

As a leading practice in orthopedic specialties, Advanced Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Institute (AOSMI) assists individuals in resolving bone-related problems and conditions through fostering and maintaining optimal bone health. “There are a number of factors Read More

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We all know aging can take its toll on our bones, joints and overall mobility. Our movements and reflexes slow, our bones get thinner and lose their density, and we tend to naturally cut back on activity. But did you also know there are steps you can take to preserve and protect your bone and joint health?

The key to continued mobility as we age is staying active, sometimes even when we don’t feel like it. Just as important, is knowing our bodies, and its limitations. We boost our bone strength with exercises that “load” or compress them, but those activities are harder on our joints. Before starting on any exercise regimen, check with your physician, or work with a physical therapist, or personal trainer experienced in working with seniors to know what would be best for you.

Osteoporosis is sometimes referred to as a “silent thief” because it usually has no symptoms. Approximately one in four women and one in eight men over the age of 50 have been diagnosed with this condition.

It is important to note that it is normal to lose bone mass as we age, and that the definition of osteoporosis, or low bone density, uses the bone density of a young woman as the standard or “norm.” It is therefore logical that the bone densities of many middle-aged and older women are considered low. Nevertheless, osteoporosis can potentially diminish a person’s quality of life.