Fibromyalgia: Curable Despite What Your Doctors Says

Taking a Natural Approach to Finding a Cure

By Michael E. Platt, MD

 

I have often told my patients that if they are feeling aches and pains, the best thing they can have is fibromyalgia. Of course, a statement like that tends to create some confusion, considering that people with fibromyalgia are always told there is no cure for this condition. But, in fact, fibromyalgia is curable—despite what doctors say—when the underlying cause is treated.

Curing a disease requires treating the underlying cause of the condition; however, today’s medical system concentrates instead on treating symptoms, often with extremely toxic medications. In the case of fibromyalgia, the drug Lyrica, used to treat nerve pain, fits comfortably into this category. In addition, do not be deceived by the manufacturer’s TV ad suggesting that the pain of fibromyalgia is due to the overstimulation of nerve endings.

The pain of fibromyalgia, which is neither an inflammatory condition nor an autoimmune disease, is actually caused by the buildup of lactic acid in muscle tissue and tendon sheaths. It is the same pain referred to as “muscle burn” by athletes who work out. At this point it has become obvious that in order to eliminate the pain of fibromyalgia, one has to prevent the buildup of lactic acid, which, in turn, is accomplished by treating the underlying cause(s) of this condition.

There is no simple, one-size-fits-all underlying cause of fibromyalgia, but all causes share common factors. For example, the only situation that creates a buildup of lactic acid is persistent muscle tension over a certain amount of time. There are a number of things that can lead to muscle tension, but the one we will focus on is internalization of anger.

Anger can be an extremely powerful emotion. If people do not allow it to be released, it will be internalized and produce a situation creating persistent muscle tension, producing the buildup of lactic acid.

So the question arises: “Where does this anger come from?”

There appear to be two major sources: an extremely stressful relationship, such as living with an abusive spouse, necessitating “walking on eggshells;” or caregiving for a family member, requiring putting one’s own life on hold until that person passes on. The second major source of anger is actually a lot more common, and although it is consistently unrecognized as a source of anger, it is thankfully a lot easier to address. At this point we have arrived at the most common underlying cause of fibromyalgia: the presence of excess adrenaline.

As many people are aware, adrenaline is known as the fight-or-flight hormone. It is extremely powerful and is certainly capable of creating intense anger such as “road rage.” (I will be discussing the interrelationship between adrenaline and fibromyalgia, but please be aware that this hormone is also the underlying cause of many other conditions that are also felt to be incurable.)

As previously mentioned, the pain of fibromyalgia is caused by a buildup of lactic acid from constant muscle tension. Again, this can be caused by anger from certain interpersonal relationships or from the release of excess adrenaline. Contributing to the buildup is the tension of the muscles compressing small veins—venules—which carry lactic acid out of muscles. At the same time, muscle tension similarly compresses lymphatic vessels that also function to remove lactic acid from muscles. This creates a situation where the lactic acid is continuously building up, but is not able to be drained.

In addition, this persistent muscle tension is responsible for the constant fatigue that fibromyalgia patients complain of. Muscle tension is also responsible for other symptoms associated with this condition, such as temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ)—which causes pain and dysfunction in the jaw—the grinding of teeth, restless leg syndrome (RLS)—unpleasant sensations in the legs and an uncontrollable urge to move them—and occipital neuritis, which is a headache often confused with a migraine because of its severe pain radiating from the base of the skull to the back of the eye.

If one is able to accept that excess adrenaline is the underlying cause of many cases of fibromyalgia, then one can easily postulate that the lowering of adrenaline can actually be curative of this condition—and it is. Additionally, eliminating those stresses caused by the actions of other people can also cure fibromyalgia caused by unfortunate life situations. I have witnessed this repeatedly in multiple cases. It might not be easy getting rid of an abusive spouse, arranging caretakers for a family member, or even separating from a pet that causes anger, but the health rewards are worth pursuing these changes.

To lower adrenaline levels, we must first understand why the body overproduces this hormone. Up until a certain time in history, the body only produced excess adrenaline in times of danger. It allowed people to either face the danger or run away from it—the fight-or-flight response. Such a physical response lasted only a few minutes, and as soon as the danger passed, the adrenaline level returned to normal. Today, however, there are people who release adrenaline all day and night without being in danger. So why is this?

First, a little background information. It is important to understand that the brain uses more sugar than any other part of the body. When sugar is taken away from the brain, the brain falls asleep. This is commonly referred to as hypoglycemia. People often get sleepy between 3 and 4 p.m., when insulin levels peak. When insulin goes up, blood sugar goes down. Some people get hypoglycemic after eating, simply because food stimulates the release of insulin (some foods more than others). It is also not unusual for people to get sleepy in a car, either as a driver or as a passenger. The reason for this is that the brain uses up a lot of fuel when a person is riding in a car. From a survival standpoint, the body always wants to make sure the brain has enough fuel.

Thus, any time the body detects a low amount of fuel in the brain, it releases adrenaline to raise sugar levels. It is a process called gluconeogenesis, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, and allows for the conversion of protein into sugar. We are now at the point that it is possible to visualize how fibromyalgia can be significantly improved simply by providing the brain with the necessary fuel to prevent the need for releasing adrenaline. Generally speaking, it only takes about 24 hours to significantly reduce adrenaline. This reduction causes a relaxation of muscle tension and an improvement in circulation, which allows for the elimination of excess lactic acid.

The best sugar for the brain can be found in green vegetables. However, the best fuels for the brain are those oils that create ketone bodies in the brain, such as coconut oil or palm oil. By incorporating these foods into your diet, you should notice a reduction in symptoms of excess adrenaline fairly rapidly. The other major component needed for reducing adrenaline is using bio-identical progesterone cream that has a strength of 5 percent (50 mg) per pump—the amount required to block adrenaline and control insulin. Additionally, ancillary aids to help with the symptoms of fibromyalgia include d-ribose, magnesium, coenzyme Q10, and certainly a high dose of vitamin D3 (10,000 to 15,000 IU per day), along with vitamin K2 (MK-7).

Generally speaking, use of these methods often leads to a cure for fibromyalgia in three days to three weeks.

 

About the Author:

Michael E. Platt, MD, has been board-certified in internal medicine. Known internationally as a specialist in bio-identical hormones, he is the author of The Miracle of Bio-Identical Hormones and Adrenaline Dominance. Visit him at plattwellness.com.

19 Comments on Fibromyalgia: Curable Despite What Your Doctors Says

  1. This is brilliant and it makes perfect sense! I have dealt with Fibromyalgia for 15 years and studied and tried every possible protocol. None have completely worked. The adrenaline issue could result from many different issues that all lead to Fibromyalgia! Thank you for sharing this wonderful information. Amanda

  2. I have always believed this! Just did not know quite how to articulate it. I felt it was a combination of RSI,a traumatic ATV accident and then life stress in switching careers. I was constantly in flight or fight for 13yrs my body just could not take it. My first symptoms were like I had done a hardcore workout and pain in the base of my skull. No one would listen. I have searched for natural cures forever. I do take Co Q10, PQQ and glutamine but how do you get an Rx for the topical progesterone? Thank you so much for this article as it makes all my suspicions a reality!

    • it was debunked. And my brain NEVER falls asleep. That’s one of the problems with fibro. And vitamin D? Please.. maybe this is just a very old article?

    • I would still be willing to believe the soreness could be caused by micro trauma to the muscles and fascia due to constant over exertion and lack of proper recovery time. The fascia is chock full of nerves, and my fascial pain from an old back injury tends to radiate outward during stressful events. Dehydration also seems to play a factor for me, I believe since dryness exacerbates micro tearing. I read somewhere that the same glands on your kidneys that make adrenaline and cortisol also make a hormone called aldosterone that regulates how much water and electrolytes stay in your blood (which makes sense, because that’s what your kidneys are all about.) So, low adrenal gland function could also play a role, there. This also makes sense, since how much fluid is in your blood partially controls blood pressure, and we’ve all heard that during periods of HIGH adrenaline, your blood pressure stereotypically goes up. Of course, blood pressure is also controlled by vascular tension. I switched doctors a couple years ago and was finally able to get acknowledgement for my Reynaud’s condition. The doctor put me on the blood pressure medicine procardia to help try to relax my veins. At the same time, she suggested I look into Sjorgens syndrome to see if I thought any of the symptoms sounded familiar. Sjorgens is an auto immune disorder where your body attacks your moisture producing glands around the body. I don’t know if I have it, but I certainly seem to be on the drier side. What got me is when I heard of an old folk remedy that’s supposed to be the best thing you can do for a cold because it stimulates your immune system: wear wet socks to bed. Having cold feet makes your immune system go into overdrive! My cold feet are caused by muscle tension caused by stress and poor blood pressure control, exacerbates by problems with fluid retention. All caused by constant, carefully controlled anger! Yes, I could definitely believe that. I’m curious how many fibromyalgia sufferers are first or only children, because my mom doesn’t have it, but my aunt does, and I always thought she and I were a lot alike in how we “controlled” (or whatever) our stress because we were both first horns.

  3. Hips oil needs to be refrigerated after opening in order to increase its shelf life,
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  4. Very interesting. I was treated for Hepatitis C with Harvoni. I notice upon taking the drug that I felt, what I described as, a fresh sensation coursing through my body. Perhaps this was adrenaline. Ever since treatment, I have had a new kind of pain – tension in my muscles. I’m going to try this protocol.

  5. It’s similar to tying up in horses. This us why massage therapy works so well for me…it moves the toxins and lactic acid out of the tissues and improves lymphatic drainage. I’ve recently read that thiamine helps. Worth a try.

  6. I have lived with fibro for 30 years. I used to have pets, dogs and cats for one. I am now so allergic to them that even the allergists cant get me to tolerate being around them. I am still taking shots but can’t get above 31. Most people start immunotherapy above that number. Sleep problems, memory,bowel problems. pain, stiffness, skin rashes, itchyness, chemical sensitive, hair loss,faigue,numbness, swollen hands and feet, allergic to 75% of my surroundings to name a few symptoms.I don’t have an angry bone in my body and believe it or not I volunteer an hour 4 days a week to help the less fortunate than myself.This Dr needs to talk to my allergist so I can be cured…if I am not careful I could go into anaphylaxis. My belief in my higher power is what keeps me smiling even through all this.I would like to live again because I get 4 hours a day that I do function most days. Lastly I drink smoothies with kale spinach broccoli blue berries soy milk and protein powder most days for better health.

  7. Fibromyalgia is none other than a manifestation of Tension Myoneural Syndrome, resulting from stress, anger and fear of things or of the pain itself. I had very severe symptoms and was cured by following the free online TMS recovery program and by reading Dr Sarnos books. I am very angry that people keep saying that fibromyalgia cannot be cured, condemning people to a lifetime of suffering. This article provides a more scientific explanation to its mechanics but at the end of it all fibromyalgia resulta from stressful situations and CAN be cured by dealing with stress and through paychotherapy.

    • I am living proof that is not correct. I read those articles and there was not a single cited study or even a reference,just generalities. I have been through extensive counselling/therapy and as necessary as that is it cannot cure the disregulation of the neuroendocrine system. Abuse and trauma over an extensive period of time can change brain chemistry permanently – therapy cannot undo that. How TMS, most commonly associated with back pain can be equated to the myriad of potential symptoms of FMS is too big a stretch to plausibly connect them. I’ve been sick for 36yrs and if therapy was the answer I would have been well 20yrs ago when I finally escaped my abusers and began counselling in earnest.

      • I’m not the one to judge your personal efforts. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to conduct precise studies on the issue, because every person is different, so every person’s pain manifests itself a bit differently. Did you try out a TMS recovery programme, involving daily work (there is a free one on the TMS wiki, and another program, Unlearn Your Pain, that you have to pay for). If you keep believing that your problems are structural, you will never improve though, the trick is convincing yourself that you can heal – I didn’t emphasize that in my last post.
        TMS is not solely back pain, back pain is simply a common manifestation. I had pain in my piriformis, in the tendons and muscles on my knees and calves, in my neck, shoulders, elbows and hands, both sides, places which doctors associate with fibromyalgia. I couldn’t even walk for 5 minutes without excruciating pain. Today I can hike all day and I also rock climb. And the trick was also starting to exercise a little more each day without fearing the pain that might come afterwards. If you keep fearing the pain, it will keep coming, it’s all a vicious cycle. To be honest my psychotherapist only helped me after I started the recovery process myself. You cannot solely depend on a doctor or psychotherapist to heal, it will have to come from you.
        Once again, I don’t know what you have or haven’t tried exactly, but believing that you cannot heal might be blocking your progress. Your trauma might have happened a long time ago, and you might think it’s ‘over’, but your unconscious remembers it only too well, and your body has probably developed a vicious pain cycle as a way to deal with it.
        Let me know if you try the TMS programme (religiously), since so far I haven’t heard of a single person who didn’t benefit from it, even if not completely.

        • I am still living proof it doesn’t work. What you advocate is old news to many of us and when we tried it we were so desperate to be well we gave it everything. It cannot help someone who has FM resulting from an Acquired Brain Injury neither can it help someone whose prepubescent years were the initial onset period unless it is done before certain parts of the brain lose their plasticity. The brain we know now has an incredible ability to utilise another part of the brain and conpensate for function but it isn’t possible in every circumstance. There are other programmes out there virtually the same as well offered by many different people, this is not a unique approach any longer. I wish I had my money and effort back for all the alternative methods I was told were guaranteed to succeed. There is nothing that I and others have not thrown at this condition to no avail and much disappointment in the wasted finance and energy.

      • Miriam, I completely agree. ‘Talking therapies’ didn’t help me either, by the time I engaged in it, my ‘trauma’ had well and truly manifested itself physiologically after years and years of nocturnal panic attacks, preventing me from sleeping. More importantly, preventing me from having the necessary REM level of restorative sleep essential to process all those traumatic memories – resulting in me being ‘stuck’ emotionally and then physically for years…..I hold out hope that EMDR will enable me to process those memories finally with mimicking the eye movements that I needed to reach but failed to in my superficial and disrupted levels of sleep. Does this resonate with anyone?

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